Waples Wines Northern Travellers Tips 12 : Gybing in Lots of Wind…!!

Waples Wines Traveller Tips!

And now another of our regular Travellers Tips, this time from Richard Lovering:

Traveller Tips #12 Gybing in lots of wind!:

“When it’s windy the crew pulls the main over during the gybe from the centre main sheet, because this allows a better pull on it. Also, before going for the pole make sure the boat is flat and fully under control.”

Waples Wines Traveller's Tips!

“Finally, before you go into the gybe you should also make sure the pole is at the right height, in order that you can get the pole back onto the mast quickly after the gybe without fighting the downhaul. ”

Helm, Richard Lovering, FF4402

WW Northern Travellers Tips 11 : Starting and finding the right tack…!!

Here’s another installment in our Traveller Tips series, this time from multiple champion Richard Lovering:-

Traveller Tips #11 Starting:

“We use a Wot-tac to work out line bias and always take a lot of wind bearings so we know what the wind is doing.

Once line is set we already know what a square line should be, then sailing down the line getting your heading you can work out which end is biased. There are is also the Tacking Master for this too:
 

Wot-Tac:


Available from here (other retailers available!): http://www.xtremity.net/acatalog/Wot-Tac-Race-Planner—special-offer-wottac.html

 

Tacking Master:


Available from here (again, we aren’t endoring this supplier specifically): https://www.force4.co.uk/force-4-tackingmaster.html

 

Helm, Richard Lovering, FF4002

Waples Wines Northern Travellers Tip of the Week – Number 9 !!!

Here’s another installment in our Traveller Tips series, and it’s from sponsor of the series Justin Waples:-

When light air sailing on a reservoir, remember to move the mast forward with the controls as the wind goes light (ie. when the crew sits inside the boat)…….and then move it back to neutral as the crew sits on the windward deck.

Practice it beforehand….. look at the top of the mainsail when it’s light, trim the main to your normal position then move the mast forward (approx. 2″ if it’s really light) and see the difference (you might need to then ease the mainsheet slightly too….the top 1/3 of the leech just fans out.

Helm, Justin Waples, FF4033

Waples Wines Northern Travellers – Tip Number 8 !!!

Traveller Tips #8 Following Others:

“It is good to watch what other boats do but not to slavishly follow them. They may have made route decisions relative to other boats or the wind conditions at the time which would be different by the time you reach the same position or on the next lap

At inland venues just because something worked on lap one it will not necessarily work on lap two. Whilst it is good to watch what others do, try to work out why it worked to help you make your decision.

Finally, remember: if you have not been able to understand what was going on, go and ask the experienced sailor after the race – they are usually more than willing to help!”

Helm, David McKee, FF4005

Waples Wines Northern Travellers -Tip Number 3 !!

Travellers tip #3 Rudder play:

“The next time you are in the dinghy park go around the other Flying Fifteens and see if you can move the bottom tip of their rudders. If you can there will be movement between the rudder bushes and the rudder stock. This is bad when sailing, as the rudder will vibrate and upset the flow of the water across the rudder causing drag and slowing you down.

The solution is to replace the nylon bushes which are found top and bottom of the rudder tube. I would recommend that you replace one at a time starting with the top bush and see if that solves the problem. To get the bushes out first try and tap them out with a long shafted screwdriver and if that doesn’t work you may have to use a junior hacksaw blade and wrap tape around one end to form a makeshift handle and cut saw drafts in the bush all around but be careful not to damage the rudder tube you will then be able to pull the bush out with a pair of long nose pliers.

You can then clean off the inside of the tube with fine sandpaper, apply a spot of epoxy glue and replace the old bush with a new one that you will be able to purchase from Pinnell and Bax. While you are attending to the rudder bushes you may also check that your rudder fits snugly to the hull. If there is a gap of over 6mm then you are again upsetting the flow of water across the rudder which slows you down. You can either push the rudder further up through the rudder tube or you may have to reshape the flange of the rudder. Either way make sure that the rudder then rotates freely without scrapping the hull”.

Helm, Bobby Salmond, ƒƒ202.

Waples Wines Northern Travellers – Tip of the Month 2 !!

Travellers tip #2 Kicker setting:On my boat the kicker is one of the most constantly adjusted settings.  In simple terms, other than the main and jib sheets it is the control which mostly affects the speed and balance of a fifteen. Therefore, it should be in a very accessible place.  I have mine on the mainsheet jammer which I like because you never run out of adjustment which can happen with the twin control system if they are not continuous. There are well documented numbers about kicker tension in different wind strengths but my view is you should learn to develop “feel” from the rudder without looking at the sails all the time.

Light winds upwind and downwind i.e. when the crew is in the bottom of the boat; it should always be very slack.  You don’t get much rudder feedback from a fifteen in these conditions. Medium winds upwind.  This is when you can “feel” the difference.  Start to apply kicker just as the boat starts to become overpowered (ie: the rudder loads up and you find yourself having to ease the main to stop the boat heeling and luffing into the wind).  You will find as you pull on the kicker the boat will heel less, the rudder will “feel” more balanced  and you can keep the boom centralised which will help with pointing. However, you must be quick to ease the kicker again if the wind lightens as the leech of the main will quickly become too tight and will stall. You should “feel” the boat rapidly slowing down and the rudder going very light.  I can’t stress enough how important it is not to be ‘over-kickered’ when this happens.

Medium winds downwind; it should always be slackish.

Heavy winds upwind; keep pulling on the kicker until the mainsail shape distorts (excessive creases from spreaders to outhaul) and then let it back a bit.  If boat is set right the rudder should “feel” almost neutral (ie: a little weather helm but you are not fighting it all the time).

Heavy winds downwind; firstly, make sure you ease the kicker lots before bearing away around the windward mark.  This will make the manoeuvre much easier as you will not have to fight a rudder which is trying to make the boat head into the wind.  It will also be kinder on your gooseneck fitting! When reaching with the kite it should be well eased.  This will let the spinnaker do the work and keep the boat flat, the rudder neutral and the boat will “feel” under easy control. When running it should also be well eased but if the boat starts to lose control and keeps trying to bear away into a gybe pull the kicker back on a bit until the rudder loads reduce and the boat is back under control”. Helm, Greg Wells, ƒƒ4030.

The 2018 Dates for the Waples Wines Northern Travellers Series…..(so organised!)

click here to read the entry on the UKFFA website


The 2017 series proved very successful you may have read the series report and seen the overall results, if not you can find these on the class website at www.flying15.org.uk, or on the newly setup series Facebook site,the linkis https://www.facebook.com/groups/794276470729519/. If that doesn’t work you just need to search for ‘Flying Fifteen Northern Traveler Series’ and it should come up. 

The Facebook page has been setup by Rebecca Ogden who is assisting with next years program. The purpose of this is to share event photos, reports, results etc as the series progresses. For those of you on Facebook we hope you will follow  the site. For those not on Facebook we will keep in touch via email and fleet captains as before.
The program for 2018 has now been completed , so you can start to plan your 2018 campaign. The events will be as follows;
June  2/3      Rutland SC
July    14/15   Bassenthwaite SC
Sept   15/16   Burton SC
Sept   29/30   Dovestone SC
Oct     27/28   Notts county SC ( Including final series prize-giving
For further information on the series contact    David McKee on davidjmckee@icloud.com   or Rebecca Ogden on rebecca.ogden35@gmail.com    
Best wishes from the Series team, we look forward to seeing you on the water next year”
David mckee

07836 602084

Northern Travellers!!! …. Get Your 2017 Dates Here….!!

Waples Wines LogoThe dates for the 2017 series have now been agreed.  We are pleased that Waples Wines have again agreed to provide support to the series. The arrangements for the series remain the same although we have now added Nott’s County SC who were one of the founding clubs when the series started 11 years ago. Ogston will be taking a rest from the series for this year but hopefully will return in the future. As before 2 events are required to qualify. The events are spread nicely across the year and will culminate at Nott’s County in early October.

April 22-23rd RWYC
May 20-21st Dovestone SC
June 3-4th Rutland SC
July 8-9th Bassenthwaite SC
Sept 2-3rd Burton SC
Oct 7-8th Nott’s County SC